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  • Writer's pictureIgnacio Ponce Echegaray

UNHRC BP Question #1

Should there be a restriction on the exercise of the right of the right to protest? If so, what must this restriction require for it to be lawful and proportional?


This question must be answered by October 9th, 23:59pm (GMT-5 / Lima Time).

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UNHRC BP Question #2

In the current social context, can it be found an actual stigma when it comes to the exercise of the right to protest? Or can it possibly be identified as terrorism enhancement? This question must be

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María Ce
María Ce
17. Okt. 2023

Venezuela: "Your right to swing your arms ends just where the other man's nose begins." - Zechariah Chafee.


The Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela deeply supports the sentiment expressed in this quote as one's right has its limit in another's, in a way in which they can coexist harmoniously. Venezuela is currently facing constant violent protests and strongly endorses the use of aid to transform them into peaceful initiatives. Ever since the start of President Maduro's government in our country, the number of protests has peaked, but instead of being peaceful, most of these have become violent and have led to the loss of many innocent lives. Recent incidents involving rock-throwing, setting fire to government buildings, and even theft constantly endanger…


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Ana Paula Flores
Ana Paula Flores
10. Okt. 2023

The Republic of Iran considers restrictions on the exercise of the right to protest exercised in a lawful and proportional manner as necessary to protect national security, Islamic principles and the sovereignty of its authorities within the country.

Currently, we have aggravated sanctions for the violation of the dress code applied to girls and women, one of the main causes for which the recent waves of protests have been produced, with the aim of restoring law and order and preserving the principles of the nation's predominant religion, Islam. The sanctions include imprisonment, economic fines and confiscation of property; however, our Republic has been affected by Amnesty International, as well as other international organisations, accusing our country's "morality police" of alleged…


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Aru
Aru
10. Okt. 2023

UKRAINE: "When the people are free to speak, the government is afraid. When the people are afraid to speak, the government is free." by Lesya Ukrainka


In Ukraine, the right to protest, enshrined in its Constitution, is a fundamental aspect of democratic governance, which played a crucial role during the Euromaidan protests in 2013-2014, which brought about significant political changes in the country's history, including the challenging backdrop of the recent conflict with Russia initiated in February 2022. However, as in any democracy, there are circumstances when it becomes necessary to restrict this right in the interest of maintaining public order, safeguarding national security, and protecting the rights of third parties. This text explores Ukraine's position on restricting the right…


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Valeria Baquerizo
Valeria Baquerizo
10. Okt. 2023

Should there be a restriction on the exercise of the right of the right to protest? If so, what must this restriction require for it to be lawful and proportional?


The Republic of India is in favor and completely supports freedom of expression, as it is already known one of our biggest social victories was Mahatma Gandhi in the search and fight for peace, but when it comes to our case, measures shall be taken as 1.408 billion of people are living and an extensive protest interferes in the daily routines of our citizens, not to avoid mentioning that in 2020-2021, 200 million workers protested ending with one deceased and 400 people were injured. India will not allow any of…


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sofia.vargas
10. Okt. 2023

Italy, like many democracies, recognizes the right to protest as a fundamental human right. This right is enshrined in various international agreements, such as the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and the European Convention on Human Rights, to which Italy is a signatory. The Italian Constitution also guarantees the right to assemble peacefully without arms, emphasizing its importance in fostering democratic participation.


Nonetheless, the right to protest is not absolute. While democracies embrace the principles of free expression and assembly, they also have a responsibility to maintain public order, protect citizens from harm, and ensure the functioning of society. In certain situations, restrictions on the right to protest may be deemed necessary to strike a balance between the individual's freedom…


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